Yamaha Trilogy: Hageman Seca 400

Custom builder Greg Hageman works his magic on Yamaha’s unloved Seca 400 for Yamaha enthusiast Mike Martens.

| July/August 2018

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    Greg Hageman's Seca 400.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
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    The small Koso North Americ multi-function meter.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
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    Greg Hageman's Seca 400.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
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    Note the trick adjustable SSK clutch lever and the mirror from Halcyon Classic Parts.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
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    Greg Hageman's Seca 400.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
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    The slick aftermarket LED headlight uses a glass lens and puts out a surprising throw of light.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
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    Sally Everhart aboard the Seca 400 in the West Bottoms of Kansas City, MO.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
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    The circa-1969 Yamaha DS6 tank shines better than new.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
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    The LEDs built into the swingarm serve as tail, brake and blinker lights.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
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    Thanks to the YICS system and the pod air filters, the Seca makes a sweet induction noise to match the mellow tone of the exhaust.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
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    The 399cc parallel twin makes a claimed 42 horsepower at 9,500rpm. The monoshock can be seen behindthe number plates.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography
  • seca 400
    The 399cc parallel twin makes a claimed 42 horsepower at 9,500rpm. The monoshock can be seen behindthe number plates.
    Photo by Don Gawf Photography

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Hageman Seca 400
Engine: 399cc air-cooled DOHC parallel twin, 69mm x 53.4mm bore and stroke, 9.7:1 compression ratio, 42hp @ 9,500rpm (claimed)
Top speed: 100mph (stock, period test)
Carburetion: Two Mikuni VM34
Transmission: 6-speed, chain final drive
Electrics: 12v, electronic ignition
Frame/wheelbase: Pressed steel spine w/engine as stressed member/55in (1,397mm)
Suspension: 41mm telescopic forks front, monoshock rear w/Hagon shock
Brakes: 12.6in (320mm) single disc front, 6.25in (158.8mm) SLS drum rear
Tires: 110/90 x 18in Dunlop TT100GP front, 130/80 x 18in Dunlop TT100GP rear, Borrani aluminum rims
Weight (w/half tank fuel): 357lb (163kg)
Seat height: 31.5in (800mm)
Fuel capacity: 2.9gal (11ltr)
Price then: $1,999 (1982)

Popular culture has given us more than a few great book and movie trilogies, including Lord of the Rings, The Matrix and Mad Max — amazing stories told over a series of three books or films — or, in some cases, both.

Twisting the metaphor slightly, Greg Hageman of Hageman Cycles has produced a unique motorcycle trilogy of commissioned Yamaha builds for enthusiast Mike Martens. Will Hollywood come calling? Not likely, but the first two custom Yamahas have been feature stories in Motorcycle Classics. The first, a 1982 Virago 920, appeared in the May/June 2012 issue, followed by a Seca 900 café racer in the May/June 2015 issue. Completing the trilogy is this now-stunning 1982 Yamaha Seca 400, a bike that Mike asked Greg to build for his girlfriend, Sally Everhart, to ride.

Seca 400

At the end of the 2015 story about the Seca 900, I wrote that Mike wanted Greg to construct a café bike based on a modern Yamaha SR400. I also mused if, in three years' time, I'd be writing a story about the build. Well, it's almost exactly three years to the day later and I'm penning the story, but it isn't about an SR400.



"We bought an SR400 for Sally," Mike explains. "She'd learned to ride when she was younger, but was just returning to the sport. It's a great bike, and the more time that we spent with it the more it seemed to me that you could work hard to make it cool, but in the end it wasn't going to be any better than it already was, and it would be a shame to cut it up."

An ardent fan of Yamahas of the late '70s and early '80s, Mike grew up during that era and has images of those machines almost permanently etched into his brain. Back then, he'd spend hours poring over the contemporary literature, and his first motorcycle was a Yamaha 750 Seca purchased in 1982.






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